2nd Paper

Topics: Pharmacology, Ayurveda, Garlic Pages: 15 (4709 words) Published: March 25, 2015
WORLD JOURNAL OF PHARMACY AND PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES
Mohammed et al.

World Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

SJIF Impact Factor 2.786

Volume 4, Issue 1, 11-25.

Research Article

ISSN 2278 – 4357

MEDICINAL PLANTS OF TWO FOLK HERBALISTS IN TANGAIL
SADAR, BANGLADESH
Sabbir Ahmed Opu, K.M. Istieake Ahmed, Zobayer Ahmed, Maksuda Khaton Sonda, Ahmed Abrar Muttaki, Mohd. Shahidul Islam, Mohammed Rahmatullah* Department of Pharmacy, University of Development Alternative, Dhanmondi, Dhaka-1209, Bangladesh.

ABSTRACT
Article Received on
16 Oct 2014,
Revised on 11 Nov 2014,
Accepted on 07 Dec 2014

Background. Folk herbalists (FH) are folk medicinal practitioners who practice folk medicine on a part-time basis. The objective of this study was to document the ethnomedicinal practices of two FHs

Nov 2014

practicing in Tangail Sadar area in Tangail district of the country.

*Correspondence for

Methods. Interviews of the FHs were carried out with the help of a

Author

semi-structured questionnaire and the guided field-walk method.

Dr. Mohammed

Results. FH 1 used 27 plants distributed into 24 families in his

Rahmatullah
Department of Pharmacy,

formulations. FH 2 used 26 plants distributed into 18 families in his

University of Development

formulations. FH 1 treated gastrointestinal disorders, pain, heart

Alternative, Dhanmondi,

disorders, kidney and gall bladder stones, helminthiasis, sexual

Dhaka-1209, Bangladesh

problems, cuts and wounds, skin disorders, snake or poisonous insect

rahamatm@hotmail.com

bite, and rheumatism. FH 2 treated respiratory tract disorders,

gastrointestinal disorders, physical weakness, pain, sexual problems, helminthiasis, diabetes, jaundice, hypertension, and skin disorders. Conclusion. The study suggests that not all FHs treat the same diseases or use the same formulations of medicinal plants. As a result, to obtain a comprehensive view of the treatment methods of FHs, more documentation is necessary of their treatment methods.

KEYWORDS: Ethnomedicine, folk herbalist, Tangail, Bangladesh INTRODUCTION
Various types of medicinal practitioners exist in Bangladesh. Besides allopathic medicinal practitioners, there are numerous forms of traditional medicinal practices in the country, which includes Ayurveda, Unani, folk medicine, folk herbalists, home remedies, acupuncture,

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Vol 4, Issue 1, 2015

11

Mohammed et al.

World Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

aroma therapy, and spiritual practices. Folk medicine practitioners, otherwise known as Kavirajes possibly form the largest group. Kavirajes are not certified practitioners, but who have picked up some or considerable knowledge on disease treatment (usually with medicinal plants) from personal experiences or knowledge gathered from a close member of an earlier generation of the family. Folk herbalists (FHs) are part-time folk medicinal practitioners. They are usually engaged in some other type of work and practice folk medicine in their leisure time. Their knowledge is gained from hearsay, personal experiences, or knowledge gained from an earlier generation of the family. In Bangladesh, a FH, despite his or her practicing part-time, may have a large number of patients, depending on the success of their medicinal formulations.

FHs usually use medicinal plants in their formulations but also may include animal parts, insects and minerals. Very little has been documented on the medicinal practices of FHs. Yet, their knowledge contributes on a daily basis to the health-care of the country. Moreover, they use medicinal plants for the most part. In the present world scenario, with the emergence of new diseases and allopathic drug-resistant vectors, medicinal plants can play a vital role in the development of new drugs, for many modern drugs have been discovered from medicinal plants based on close observations of traditional...

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