father first time

Topics: Childbirth, Obstetrics, Caesarean section Pages: 8 (2007 words) Published: January 19, 2014
Women and Birth (2011) 24, 129—136

a v a i l a b l e a t w w w. s c i e n c e d i r e c t . c o m

journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/wombi

Fathers’ birth experience in relation to
midwifery care
¨
´
Ingegerd Hildingsson a,b,*, Linnea Cederlof b, Sara Widen b
a
b

Department of Health Science, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden

Received 6 August 2010; received in revised form 15 December 2010; accepted 15 December 2010

KEYWORDS
Fathers;
Experience;
Childbirth;
Normal birth;
Support

Abstract The aim was to identify the proportion of fathers having a positive experience of a normal birth and to explore factors related to midwifery care that were associated with a positive experience.

Background: Research has mainly focused on the father’s supportive role during childbirth rather than his personal experiences of birth.
Methods: 595 new fathers living in a northern part of Sweden, whose partner had a normal birth, were included in the study. Data was collected by questionnaires. Odds Ratios with 95% confidence interval and logistic regression analysis were used. Results: The majority of fathers (82%) reported a positive birth experience. The strongest factors associated with a positive birth experience were midwife support (OR 4.0; 95 CI 2.0—8.1), the midwife’s ongoing presence in the delivery room (OR 2.0; 1.1—3.9), and information about the progress of labour (OR 3.1; 1.6—5.8).

Conclusion: Most fathers had a positive birth experience. Midwifery support, the midwife’s presence and sufficient information about the progress of labour are important aspects in a father’s positive birth experience. The role of the midwife during birth is important to the father, and his individual needs should be considered in order to enhance a positive birth experience. # 2010 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Australia (a division of Reed International Books Australia Pty Ltd). All rights reserved.

Introduction
The traditional role of a father in Western societies has been described as that of the breadwinner. From the 1960s, when

* Corresponding author at: Department of Health Science, Mid Sweden University, Holmgatan 10, SE-85170 Sundsvall, Sweden. Tel.: +46 70 5941982.
E-mail address: Ingegerd.hildingsson@miun.se (I. Hildingsson).

men first started to attend labour and birth in Western
societies, there was strong opposition to involving fathers
during labour; the general opinion was that men could spread infections. In some places it was considered barbaric for a
man to view a birth and it was believed that such a sight could lead to sexual inhibitions. Fathers were considered a nuisance, and it was thought that their presence would interfere with the care or they might faint [1]. Women’s support during labour was usually provided by another close woman friend

or relative [2,3]. It was later realized that fathers had a
strong desire to share the experience with their partner. The

1871-5192/$ — see front matter # 2010 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Australia (a division of Reed International Books Australia Pty Ltd). All rights reserved.

doi:10.1016/j.wombi.2010.12.003

130
presence of fathers reinforced the feeling of the joint decision to form a family. Women who had their partners with them experienced less pain, needed less pain relief, and had a better experience of childbirth [1,2].

Since the 1970s, fathers have been encouraged to participate in parental education classes in Sweden, attend the birth, and bond with the child at an early stage [4,5]. Midwives encourage fathers to participate in antenatal care, childbirth, and postpartum care. Since the 1980s, parent

education has been part of antenatal health services [6].
Research on the fathers’ feelings, perspectives, motivations and expectations began to appear in the mid-1980s [7];...
Continue Reading

Please join StudyMode to read the full document

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Choose Your Time Wisely: a Comparison of “in Praise of Slowness” and “Old Father Time Becomes a Terror” Essay
  • Book Report on "First They Killed My Father" Research Paper
  • Essay on The Transition to Parenthood in First-Time Fathers: a Systematic Review of the Literature
  • The First Time Essay
  • Essay about Father
  • Essay on First They Killed My Father
  • First They Killed My Father Essay
  • First Time Offenders Essay

Become a StudyMode Member

Sign Up - It's Free