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Topics: Pharmacology, Pharmaceutical industry, Disease mongering Pages: 6 (1721 words) Published: November 29, 2013
EXPOSING NURSING STUDENTS TO THE MARKETING METHODS OF PHARMACEUTICAL COMPANIES a recent review in the World Health Organization drug promotion database states that there is a strong association between a heavy reliance on promotion on the part of pharmaceutical reps and an overall less appropriate use of prescription drugs on the part of physicians and nurses. Heavy promotion of new drugs also leads to the widespread prescription and use of some drugs before the safety of these products is fully understood. (Civaner 396)

“Under the radar”: Nurse Practitioner Prescribers and
Pharmaceutical Industry Promotions

prescribing practices and behaviors and interface with industry, (2) perceived reliability of informa- tion provided by the pharmaceutical industry, and (3) ethical acceptability of promotional gifts and meals.(Ladd 359)

“this finding raises a concern because the respondents also noted that they were more likely to prescribe a highlighted drug after attending an industry-sponsored meal event. These data further support evidence from the medical and social science literature that gifting of any kind, even of small items such as pens, snacks, or meals, influences prescribing behaviors.”(Ladd 360)

http://www.pewhealth.org/other-resource/persuading-the-prescribers-pharmaceutical-industry-marketing-and-its-influence-on-physicians-and-patients-85899439814.

in 2011, the pharmaceutical industry spent nearly $29 billion on drug promotion

Pharmaceutical Promotions and Conflict of Interest in Nurse Practitioner’s Decision Making: The Undiscovered Country

Research indicates that healthcare professionals are influenced by pharmaceutical marketing, despite healthcare professionals’ belief to the contrary (Pence, 1994; Peterson & Potter, 2004).(Grigger 207)

The NP may function under the illusion, from the promo- tional material from the pharmaceutical company, that newer is synonymous with better. There is a difference between a ‘‘new’’ drug and a ‘‘better’’ drug. Often the reasons cited by the pro- motional material are not cost effective enough to warrant the additional expense. A healthcare provider is responsible for obtaining unbiased information to determine if a particular drug is a better choice and should not rely solely on informa- tion from the pharmaceutical company marketing the product. Let us say, for example, an extended release form of a particular drug costs $60 a month, while a twice-a-day dosage is $40 a month. Can we justify the use of a slow release if the cost is twice as much? The cost should be considered and even dis- cussed with the patient in order to make the best fit for the patient’s situation.(Grigger 209)

Don’t forget nurses
Although the public is often ignorant of this fact, nurses have a huge influence on patient care and safety. They are an important safety net—one that is now full of holes. (Gordon 13)

EXPOSING NURSING STUDENTS TO THE MARKETING METHODS OF PHARMACEUTICAL COMPANIES 62.9% said it is acceptable for nurses to receive such gifts. Additionally, 66.1% stated that it is acceptable to receive drug samples from a PSR, and 65.8% that it is also acceptable to receive a device and/or material intended for use in daily clinical practice.(Civaner 401)

Medical conflict of interest.
n 2007, the pharmaceutical industry spent more than $1 billion to cover half the cost of doctors' continuing education in the USA. Not surprisingly, industry-supported programs gave more favorable treatment to sponsors' products than independent programs, an American Medical Association ethics panel found.( USA Today 10) Education bought and paid for by drug companies is a blatant conflict of interest, no matter what its content. If doctors fail to change this system, they'll lose their most important asset, a patient's trust.( USA today 10)

Nurse practitioners’ perceptions and participation in pharmaceutical marketing. Family nurse practitioners viewed pharmaceutical...
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