Utilitarinaism

Topics: Ethics, Science, Medicine Pages: 3 (914 words) Published: September 21, 2014
An argument for human experimentation is that doing so can provide researchers with information that is needed to help find effective and ineffective treatment options. Without clinical trials and human experimentation we wouldn’t have the needed knowledge when it comes to releasing new medications, for example. Instead of experimenting with a controlled group of informed, consenting adults, we would instead be basically experimenting on people who take the untested drug. Surely there are cases where human experimentation are unethical, as in the case of Tuskegee and Willowbrook, but if the parties are fully informed and consenting I do not see an issue. Utilitarianism says that the right action is the one that, on balance, promotes the most happiness, or the greatest amount of pleasure over pain (Steinbock, 2013). We experiment on a few so that we can have the answers needed to treat the greatest number of people and give them happiness. Reference

Steinbock, B., London, A. J., Arras, J. (2013). Ethical Issues in Modern Medicine: Contemporary readings in bioethics. New York, NY: McGrath-Hill. Retrieved from http://online.vitalsource.com/#/books/0078127424/pages/77323325 An argument for human experimentation is that doing so can provide researchers with information that is needed to help find effective and ineffective treatment options. Without clinical trials and human experimentation we wouldn’t have the needed knowledge when it comes to releasing new medications, for example. Instead of experimenting with a controlled group of informed, consenting adults, we would instead be basically experimenting on people who take the untested drug. Surely there are cases where human experimentation are unethical, as in the case of Tuskegee and Willowbrook, but if the parties are fully informed and consenting I do not see an issue. Utilitarianism says that the right action is the one that, on balance, promotes the most happiness, or the greatest amount of pleasure over...
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