Water Birth

Topics: Childbirth, Obstetrics, Midwifery Pages: 3 (872 words) Published: June 25, 2012
Alternatives You can leave the pool at any time You may use a bath or a shower as an alternative Alternative therapies aid relaxation e.g.: aromatherapy, hypnosis, massage. We also have a variety of equipment for use e.g.: mats, birthing stool, exercise balls and bean bags. Your midwife will be able to discuss alternatives with you. Consequences The consequences of not accepting water for pain relief is that you would have to consider alternatives. This could be any of the points mentioned above or you might consider other Invasive and non-invasive pain relief including one of the following:TNS , Pethidine , Epidural , or Reflexology. If you decide not to access any of these forms of pain relief your labour will be more painful and you will get tired more quickly

MAT 5 William Harvey Library References RCM: Position Paper No. 1a. Use of water in labour and birth. 2000. Creation Date: 2005 Reformatted: 2007 Review Date: 2008

Maternity

If you have any question regarding the use of water or the pool, or other forms of pain relief please discuss with your midwife or doctor.

Water for Pain Relief in Labour and Birth

What's on Offer
The George Eliot Maternity Unit has a birthing pool that was provided by The League of friends, it is free of charge to use. However this may not mean it is available for your use when you are in labour. This might be because, as there is only one pool, someone is already using it or it may be that there is not enough skilled staff available. If you are considering a homebirth you can hire a pool for use at home. Women have used water for many years to provide comfort and pain relief during their labours. Your midwife will be able to give you further advice.

Reduce the need for drugs that accelerate your labour Lessen the chance of trauma to your perineum Make it more likely that you will achieve a natural birth Your partner can get in the pool with you (swimwear please) Disadvantages/risks Some studies have highlighted...

References: RCM: Position Paper No. 1a. Use of water in labour and birth. 2000. Creation Date: 2005 Reformatted: 2007 Review Date: 2008
Maternity
If you have any question regarding the use of water or the pool, or other forms of pain relief please discuss with your midwife or doctor.
Water for Pain Relief in Labour and Birth
What 's on Offer
The George Eliot Maternity Unit has a birthing pool that was provided by The League of friends, it is free of charge to use. However this may not mean it is available for your use when you are in labour. This might be because, as there is only one pool, someone is already using it or it may be that there is not enough skilled staff available. If you are considering a homebirth you can hire a pool for use at home. Women have used water for many years to provide comfort and pain relief during their labours. Your midwife will be able to give you further advice.
Reduce the need for drugs that accelerate your labour Lessen the chance of trauma to your perineum Make it more likely that you will achieve a natural birth Your partner can get in the pool with you (swimwear please) Disadvantages/risks Some studies have highlighted that there are risks to the mother and baby: Overheating, this can cause your baby 's heart rate to go up Infection, the unit has a strict policy for cleaning the pool. Dehydration, due to being to warm and not drinking enough fluid. A very small number of babies born under water have died ( the reason for this is not clear or it 's association with waterbirth). Bleeding after the delivery may be heavier. Currently you have to leave the pool to deliver the placenta (afterbirth). Due to your history, waterbirth may not be advisable. Some forms of pain relief may not be used with waterbirth e.g. pethidine or an epidural. Would the Pool be Suitable For Me? Anyone may use water for labour or birth as long as: Your pregnancy is 37 weeks or more. Baby is head first. There have been no major pregnancy problems and labour is progressing normally. You and your baby are well.
The pool is not suitable if: Your baby is not head first (breach). You or your baby are unwell (temperature) Prolonged rupture of membranes (waters have broken more than 24 hrs). If you have had certain drugs e.g.: pethidine. Certain types of bleeding during pregnancy or during labour. Things You Need to Know The guidance at the George Eliot is that labour needs to be established before you enter the pool for maximum benefit (cervix approximately 4 cms dilated). The midwife will check your temperature regularly, whilst in the water. The water temperature during labour should be no more than 37 degrees or comfortable and not to hot during the first stage of labour, and be between 36 - 37 degrees if you stay in the pool for delivery. You may use other forms of pain relief if required e.g. entonox (gas & air), aromatherapy oils but not in the water, and relaxation techniques help. You may use water if your labour has been induced and things are progressing normally, and you are well. Your baby will be lifted above the water as soon as he/she has been born. As long as the baby 's head remains above the water, he/she may remain in the pool with you for a while. You may leave the pool at any time if you feel it is not right for you. If syntometrine is required ( a drug used to aid delivery of the placenta) it is given when you have left the pool. We do not do episiotomies in the pool, however you may have a perineal tear, which may require stitches.
Does Waterbirth Help?
Advantages/benefits Some research studies have found few significant differences between waterbirth and birth on 'dry land '. However other studies have focused on the benefits that mothers and midwives believe waterbirth brings through their personal experiences of them. These studies suggest that entering water in the first stage of labour can: Help shorten the length of your labour Help you relax and cope better with contractions Make you feel more in control Make the experience more enjoyable Reduce your need for pain relieving drugs (reduce adrenalin levels and increase endorphin levels)
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